Archives

A regularly updated collection of historical records and  from the Africa Federation archives.

Haji Karmali Hansraj Jagani – Kigoma in perspective

In 1909 Karmali Hansraj Jagani accompanied by his family travelled to Dar es Salaam from India by ship “Queen Bismarck”, the journey taking a total of 9 days. His son Gulamhussein who was five years old at that time has narrated this story.

Being the first visit to a new country, Karmalibhai had no idea of what to expect. On arriving at Dar es Salaam, he stayed at Ismaili Musafarkhana. After 7 days, he travelled by train to Igalula. He then walked for two hours to Saneku, 10 miles away. From Saneku he walked 60 miles to Tabora arriving a day later. The women and children were carried all the way by porters in litter (machera).


After staying in Tabora for a month, he walked for two days to Manakulwa, 70 miles away. He joined in the employment of Walli Omar. There were 4 shops at Manakulwa; their owners being Sheriff Jiwa, Nasser Virjee, Walli Omar and an Arab, Khalil bin Nasser. After staying at Manakulwa for about a year, he again moved to Tabora.

Read More

LATE HAIDERALI MOHAMMEDALI KASSAM CHINAI - REUNION

Haideralibhai was born on 20th March 1918 in Diego Suarez, Madagascar. He studied till class six in French and Gujrati School. Side by side he studied Qur’an and Urdu language from Sunni Jamaat and Dawoodi Bohora Muallims. In 1935 he joined his father and uncle’s business till the year 1940 when his father started new business and took him as a partner. This company had a branch in Tananarive where Haideralibhai managed the business for one year it was in the year 1956. In 1958 he moved to Mauritius and Reunion to open new branches. Finally he decided to settle in Reunion in year 1958.

Read More

Archives Section (Part 5) Down the Memory Lane Photographs

A CHARITY WALK ORGANISED IN DAR-ES-SALAAM ON 9TH FEBRUARY 1986


Read More

THE KHOJA SHIA ITHNA ASHERI MOSQUE IN BAGAMOYO

The Khoja Shia Ithna Asheri Mosque in Bagamoyo was built in the year 1889. Once a thriving town, Bagamoyo was an important port entry in Eastern Africa coast, the Khoja Shia Ithnaasheri community from Kutch and Kathiawad landed in Bagamoyo like in Kilwa, Lamu and Zanzibar over a century ago, the Bagamoyo Mosque was built in 1889 to cater for the growing population of our community, there is also a Kabrastan nearby where several community members are buried. Many of our community members in around 1905 started to move out from Bagamoyo to Dar es Salaam and other places, by late 1960s, there were only two to three families of Khoja Shia Ithnaasheris who remained in Bagamoyo.

Read More

Alhaj Noormohamed Jivraj – Arua, Uganda
  

In 1915, Murabbi Noormohamed Jivraj became the first Ithnaasheri to settle in Arua. He was 29 years old at that time. Noormohamed was 19 when he travelled by dhow from India to Mombasa. From Mombasa he travelled by train to Kisumu and onwards by boat to Entebbe. He then walked 21 miles to reach Kampala. He worked for 5 years at Datoo Damji. In 1910, he went to Masindi, 130 miles from Kampala to start his own business. Masindi was undeveloped, with all houses made of mud and thatched roofs. After five years in Masindi, he moved to Arua where he opened a shop. He also opened another shop in Karuma, 14 miles away in the Congo. In 1921 he went to India and returned in 1928. By this time there were already ten Indian families in Arua and a few sturdy homes had been built.

Read More

Archives Section (Part 4) Down the Memory Lane Photographs
 
A CHARITY WALK ORGANISED IN DAR-ES-SALAAM ON 9TH FEBRUARY 1986 FOR THE DAR ES SALAAM JAMAAT HOSPITAL PROJECT
 
Elders of our community have always remained in forefront in Charity and in other Community events, this is a clear testimony of the strong Solidarity and Unity of the Khoja Shia Ithna-Asheris – This should be preserved.
 

Read More

History of the early settlement of Khoja Shia Ithna-Asheri in Arusha


Members of our community started arriving in Arusha around 1902 and by 1908 a sizeable community had been established.

The pioneer families were: Nanji Damani, Mohamed Damani, Shermohamed Sajan, Esmail Ebrahim, Hasham Ebrahim, Jaffer Pardhan, Sachoo Jivraj, Nasser Lila and Suleman Ramji. There were also 12 members from other Asian communities residing in Arusha at that time.

Majalis were initially held at the home of Hasham Ebrahim and later on at Shermohamed Sajan. Arusha was connected with Moshi in commercial activity.

Read More

Archives Section (Part 3) Down the Memory Lane Photographs

A CHARITY WALK ORGANISED IN DAR-ES-SALAAM ON 9TH FEBRUARY 1986
 

Read More

Archives Section (Part 2) Down the Memory Lane Photographs

A CHARITY WALK ORGANISED IN DAR-ES-SALAAM ON 9TH FEBRUARY 1986 FOR THE DAR ES SALAAM JAMAAT HOSPITAL PROJECT

Read More

PIRBHAI VISRAM FIRST LANDS IN LAMU, KENYA – 1897 (Part 3)

Pirbhai Visram Kaka’s Travels File:  
 
This section covers our community in Uganda, Congo, Ruanda-Urundi (presently Rwanda and Burundi)
 
In 1940, Pirbhai Visram (Kaka) who lived in Bukoba opened a branch in Kampala, Uganda. The branch started growing steadily and it ventured in coffee business in 1942.  Pirbhai’s eldest son Gulamali operated the business.  Gulamali was known for his diligence, knowledge and business acumen. They sold their Bukoba Coffee Factory to Rashid Moledina and moved to Kampala. Pirbhai Kaka then lived in Kampala till his death. Relating to the settlement of our community in Kampala, Kaka writes:
 
“Although I moved to Uganda in 1945, I travelled to Kampala quite often after Tanganyika came under British mandate in 1918. I will therefore try to recall about families settled in Uganda: “
 
Community members started establishing their business from 1902 onwards. Sheth Bahadurali Mawji established business in Jinja and Kampala in 1904.

Read More

PIRBHAI VISRAM FIRST LANDS IN LAMU, KENYA – 1897 (Part 2)

The Tabora and Bukoba Venture:
 
At the age of 22, Pirbhai Kaka left Lamu for Tabora where he arrived in 1904. He worked for four years as Manager in the firm of Sheth Omar Abdulkarim & Sons. It took him 45 days to travel by foot from Lamu to Tabora via Bukoba.
 
There were six main families in Tabora which he can remember. Sheth Nasser Virji was running a booming business and their merchandise went to distant places like Ujiji, Rwanda and Bujumbura. Arabs used to be their major customers. At that time it would take about 45 days for merchandise to reach Tabora from Bagamoyo, the main port. The goods were carried by porters who had to pass through dense forests amid danger of attack by wild animals. Sometimes the porters would be looted by raiders. There was no way to get any news of the movement of goods. It is only when the porters would reach Tabora that they would tell of their escape. Under such difficult circumstances, the company was still able to expand its business and had branches at Mwanza, Bukoba, Biharamulo, Dar es Salaam, Kigali, etc. They were considered King among the businesses in Tanganyika and they had a great influence on the German government of the time.

Read More

Please bear with us while the Africa Federation Website undergoes some essential maintenance works.

afedDonateOnline

Join Our Mailing List



The Africa Federation is a member of The World Federation of KSIMC, an NGO in Special Consultative Status with the ECOSOC of the United Nations

© Africa Federation | Site By LMNO.co.uk | SiteMap | feed-image RSS